Hobbling for float travel - who does it


barragirl

New Member
So, my horse is a chronic pawer in the float, not just little pawing, big heavy and she lifts her leg 1m high. Today she even got her hoof caught in my hay bag, I didn't even know until I went to unload her and her leg was stuck 1m in the air. Was wondering why i hadn't heard her pawing for the last bit of the trip - hee hee! It was the first trip in my brand new float and she has scratched the paint work on the inside with her hooves - grrrr...

Anyway, have been thinking about it for a while, have known other s/jumpers who have done it and certainly lots of racehorse people do it - the time has come to start properly hobble training.... I have put ropes around her legs, lifted them up and obviously by todays, foot in hay bag episode, she doesn't freak when restrained.

So next week I will commence putting the hobbles on her in the round yard, then practice putting them on her whilst tied up and then the next step will be putting them on her on the float... For all I know, by her lack of reaction today with the haybag, she could have been hobble trained when being broken in, but I am still feeling a little bit - eeeeeek - about putting them on for the first time.

Do any of you use them in the float? had success??
 


kp

Well-known Member
I don't like hobbling horses in floats. For a horse which paws I usually hang something down from the front of the knee. Every time the horse paws it hits them on the leg. I usually use a light piece of chain or three medium sized clips. I usually use electrical tape to fasten them. Just make sure you try them first where you can get them of quickly just in case the horse really dislikes them.
 


needanswers

Active Member
I guess my worry is that if you need to get her out very quickly for some reason you will get stuck, or if she tries to paw and can't she might rear and put her head through the top of your lovely new float! Also I don't know how it affects their balance in the float - my horse needs as much room as he can to stay upright.

You could try it if you think it might help but I like the idea of hanging something that will bump her knee when she goes to do it.
 


jacko88

New Member
I've hobbled horses in floats and trucks and never had an issue. I don't do them short though, just on both end rings of the hobble chain, so they can still move feet for balance.
 


Ponypuppet

New Member
What type of float have you got? I have an Imperial which has the chest bars at a high height for horses and a low one for ponies. My TB mare is terrible in the float for pawing, esp when we are almost home of stop for more than 16 seconds at traffic lights. :p I just bought an extra chest bar so the one on her side goes across the top and the bottom. Works treat :)*

- I have been advised to use hobbles, but I was worried about friction burn if she kep trying to paw. I have also had this horse fall in the float (from bad grip on floor) so was also very paranoid about having her legs tied together if it ever happend again.

My instructor uses heavy rubber sheets hanging down off the chest, middle and bum bar to stop her race horses from pawing and kicking other horses in the float. (Also good for cheeky shetland ponies) :eek:
 


Blackbat

Well-known Member
Wrecking your brand new float already?! Oh no.

If she is pawing through anxious habit, perhaps consider spending some incidental time float training, and adjusting your floating practices. She obviously wants to GET OFF and thinks of nothing but the expectation of doing so as quickly as possible.

Drive real slow, if you already do, try slower. Get her self-loading up to scratch, until she is happy to stay on even without the breech door done up, she parks herself and stays. Load her up, leave for a while, and unload without going anywhere. Chuck her on the float for all her meals. Never be in a rush to load or unload her, leave her standing for a while both before and after. And if she is pawing, don't be in a hurry to unload. Change her expectation of the float. Brain training just might help, if you are considering using a physically restrictive device to treat an already claustrophobic horse in a confined area when it needs all it's abilities just to balance.
 


ArBeeBar

New Member
We hobble train all our horses. And only hobble them in the float if they continually paw. We haven't had many horses paw, but the couple we have had are new season horses. After 2 or 3 trips they've settled since having a calm seasoned horse along side them.

In saying this - hobble training has proved it's worth tenfold. Travelling with our gorgeous young filly, we pulled up to the servo. Went and routinually checked in the float, low and behold, the hay net had become loose, fell to the floor and she was calmly standing there in a tangle. No strangle, just a look of hey mum n dad, I can't reach my hay net lol. We both looked at each other in such appreciation of this little 2 & a half year old.

Hobble training is invaluable **)
 


ArBeeBar

New Member
Should add, velco hobbles are fantastic! Especially for hobbling in the float. Just make sure the horse is hobble trained, a horse panicking in the float would be terrifying for both human and horse.
 


Lauren

Well-known Member
I would have thought it would have affected their balance?

I've never hobbled a horse, and have actually never seen it done so I'm unsure how wide they allow the horse to spread themself out. My mare always floats with her back legs stretched apart. We drive super, super slow, and she's a perfect loader and good floater.. just seems to help her balance?

Scary about the hay.. I never ever use hay nets in the float.. I prefer the bags and always clip up with a heavy duty clip to the side so they can't get caught.
 


G

GiGi

Guest
My pony paws on the way home from somewhere, has never gotten himself into trouble with it though. When he travels in a truck with 2 others, he is normally hobbled, again without a problem, as he's been hobble trained. Just stops him upsetting the others. He used to be a scrambler, but with many outings and careful driving, he doesn't scramble now, just gets a bit impatient on the way home :)
 


valdez

Active Member
If you do hobble in the float don't use chain. Use single hobble straps and connect them with baling twine or something that will break under pressure in case of emergency
 


ClubIgnite

Well-known Member
I'd do it only with a continuous pawer as its not really a great long term solution. And obviously only the fronts to be hobbled so the backs are still able to help balance, and only once the horse has been hobble trained of course.
 


barragirl

New Member
Wrecking your brand new float already?! Oh no.

If she is pawing through anxious habit, perhaps consider spending some incidental time float training, and adjusting your floating practices. She obviously wants to GET OFF and thinks of nothing but the expectation of doing so as quickly as possible.

Drive real slow, if you already do, try slower. Get her self-loading up to scratch, until she is happy to stay on even without the breech door done up, she parks herself and stays. Load her up, leave for a while, and unload without going anywhere. Chuck her on the float for all her meals. Never be in a rush to load or unload her, leave her standing for a while both before and after. And if she is pawing, don't be in a hurry to unload. Change her expectation of the float. Brain training just might help, if you are considering using a physically restrictive device to treat an already claustrophobic horse in a confined area when it needs all it's abilities just to balance.

Hi BB!! It actually has nothing to do with my driving, am total nanna always and she has no problems self loading ever, don't need to shut breech door and she will stand there - so it def isn't a scared of float situation. She only used to do it for a minute or so, but the continuos pawing has been ever since we weaned her foal but putting her on a float and wisking her away to a new agistment centre. Foal was fine, but she totally struggling. So yes, the pawing is anxiety but it is an association with leaving her foal and going to another place - have had my lovely horse whispering friend laura bird working on her. Cheers
 


barragirl

New Member
I would have thought it would have affected their balance?

QUOTE] With the right hobbles on the front legs they can still spread their legs quite sufficiently. Anways, my mare is usually stand on three legs in float because she is pawing so much! hee hee :D
 


barragirl

New Member
I don't like hobbling horses in floats. For a horse which paws I usually hang something down from the front of the knee. Every time the horse paws it hits them on the leg. I usually use a light piece of chain or three medium sized clips. I usually use electrical tape to fasten them. Just make sure you try them first where you can get them of quickly just in case the horse really dislikes them.


Hi KP! have done this one, and unfortunately didn't help! i have one determined mare!! :)*
 


barragirl

New Member
What type of float have you got? I have an Imperial which has the chest bars at a high height for horses and a low one for ponies. My TB mare is terrible in the float for pawing, esp when we are almost home of stop for more than 16 seconds at traffic lights. :p I just bought an extra chest bar so the one on her side goes across the top and the bottom. Works treat :)*

oooooh!!!! That sounds good PP! i just bought and extended height imperial, will give it a go!! thanks :)*
 


barragirl

New Member
Sorry guys I probably should have painted the whole picture - this isn't just a quick fix for me! :eek: Hobbles are my last resort, have tried putting her on float at home, feeding her, leaving her on for short while, have tried mag/vit B additives to her food for anxiety, have tried camonmile tea in her food, have tried bach flower rememdies Aspen & Mimulus, have even tried ace and have tried my friends float with her driving. So after four months, I am at the end of my tether! *#) Hobbling it is and hopefully it works :}
 


Sugar's Mum

Well-known Member
Have a look in Monty Roberts book from my hands to yours.

He suggests putting an iron bracelet around the horses pastern. like an iron ring with a section cut out so you can place it around the pastern then tie so it cant fall off.

i guess it works by distracting them when they paw. apparently it also improves the horses hoof health as an unexpected bonus.
 


kp

Well-known Member
Have a look in Monty Roberts book from my hands to yours.

He suggests putting an iron bracelet around the horses pastern. like an iron ring with a section cut out so you can place it around the pastern then tie so it cant fall off.

i guess it works by distracting them when they paw. apparently it also improves the horses hoof health as an unexpected bonus.

You can also use an old shoe for this. Just get your farrier to bang it a little more closed. Pick her foot up and slide it on so that the toe section is at the back of the pastern.
 


Lauren

Well-known Member
Thanks for answering, didn't click that you'd only hobble the front legs so they could still use their back legs to balance.
 



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